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Macedonia Travel Guides

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beTon View Drop Down
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  Quote beTon Quote  Post ReplyReply #1 Topic: Macedonia Travel Guides
    Posted: 23-Aug-2008 at 22:23
MACEDONIA
Longing for South...

There the sunrise warms the soul,
The sun gets bright in mountain woods: Younder gifts in great profusion
Richly spread by nature's power.
See the clear lake stretching white - Or bluely darkened by the wind,
Look you at the plains or mountains:
Beauty' everywhere divine.
To pipe there to my heart's content!
Ah!
let the sun set,
let me die.


When life gets in fast line, just ask for directions to Macedonia and come rest Your mind and soul and enjoy among gentle nature and dovelike people... Listed below are several web sites which may be useful in researching and obtaining information on travel guides for Macedonia:


.          Travel Guides 4 Macedonia



Travelling Man

Toward the end of a live show, weary musicians often appeal to the audience with a stock phrase intended to invigorate the proceedings: “How is everyone feeling tonight?” “I can’t hear you!” “Cleveland, make some noise!” Manu Chao, a wiry forty-six-year-old of Spanish extraction who grew up in Paris, used a different tactic when he played the first of two sold-out shows in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park in June. He shouted out the names of countries, and people cheered, often in reverse proportion to the nation’s population: “Uruguay!” Some whoops. “Costa Rica!” Roars. “Macedonia!” Total mayhem.


.           Travel Services in Macedonia 
 


.          Travel Blogs about Macedonia



.          Culture & Heritage of Macedonia



.          Nature & Geography of Macedonia

http://macedonian-hotels.mk/ in areas that dont have registered hotels or hostels, look for private accomodation

- Berovo / - Bitola / - Demir Kapija / - Dojran / - Gevgelija- Kavadarci / - Kocani / - Mavrovo / - Ohrid / - Popova Sapka- Prilep / - Resen / - Skopje / - Struga / - Tetovo / - Veles








Edited by beTon - 24-Jul-2017 at 00:35
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  Quote beTon Quote  Post ReplyReply #2 Posted: 24-Aug-2008 at 01:04
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  Quote beTon Quote  Post ReplyReply #3 Posted: 25-Aug-2008 at 22:43


Traveling  To  Macedonia  Video
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macedonia_Timeless
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD2A95F17BF157274
http://www.macedonia-timeless.com/



   


WELCOME TO MACEDONIA

   
THE LAND OF COLOURS


A DAY IN MACEDONIA - ADVENTURES OF MACEDONIA

   

Macedonia may be the most famous unknown country on earth. Our expedition discovered that this ancient land may be among the most important in history. http://adventures.yahoo.com/b/adventures/20060830/rba_bestof_0806/adventures9173

UNESCO - OHRID cradle of European culture and civilization
   
OHRID 1954 Vardar Film Production - Directed by Bilbilovski Kiro




Edited by beTon - 23-Jul-2017 at 15:40
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  Quote UrbanFreak Quote  Post ReplyReply #4 Posted: 26-Aug-2008 at 00:12
WOW beTon, great pictures. The one from Ohrid and the mountains are master pieces.
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  Quote beTon Quote  Post ReplyReply #5 Posted: 28-Aug-2008 at 16:32


  • OPEN YOUR EYES, MIND AND HEART WHILE YOU ARE VISITING MACEDONIA

It is most useful to visit and see Macedonia as cultural tourist rather than casual tourist, because Macedonia is still living cultural area... for the first and best impression, above all, I'd suggest to open the spiritual doors, Macedonia today is owing its existence to the Orthodox Christian Church through the Ohrid Archdiocese that was and still is our mother, although early Macedonian Empire lately rebuilt in the face of Byzantium Empire were our fathers, though lately till century ago Ottoman Empire was our stepfather, if can be seen like this i.e. aspects that had have shaped our land and culture...

as signpost, significant to mention is the spiritual, cultural and archaeological value of orthodox sacred architecture, that is witness of our custums and tradition, number of preserved Churches and Monasteries in Macedonia is a total of 992, featuring 150,000sq.m of Fresco paintings, 23,000 icons, 240 Iconostases, and other Church items carved in wood. In addition, there is large number of Cave Churches, which are not included in above statistic, or there are new discoveries like IXth century Monastic Cave Complex at Zrze. Macedonia as Cradle of Christianity in Europe has long tradition of building Churches and Monasteries, almost every third village
has had live monastery and every village has had at least three churches, this Orthodox Church architectural tradition has started one century after St.Apostle Paul firstly founded small Christian Communities and St.Apostle Andrew ordained St.Apostle Urban for first Episcop(Bishop) in Macedonia and St.Apostle Silvan for first Episcop of Solun(Salonica), those Apostles spread the Word of God among Macedonians and raised Christianity to main-key religion here, which with the official recognition by St.Constantin in 4th century raised the Christian Communities to Big Episcopical residences with several Metropolitans and Bishoprics in Macedonia such as those in Salonica(Solun), Philippi(Kavala), Heraclea Lincestis(Bitola), Stobi(Gradsko), Skupi(Skopje), Lihnid(Ohrid), Bargala(Shtip), Dion(Pidna), Bereu(Ber)... and century by century the significance and beauty of the sacral architecture on this land had quickly grown and become distinctive symbol of Christianity, among the unique live monuments of that architecture are St.Sophia of Constantinople(Istanbul) and St.Sophia of Lychnid(Ohrid) and many others each one holding some unique specific attributes as famous Fresco paintings or famous Iconostases or famous Icons which here in Macedonia are too many that we are lacking of funds and people for constant maintenance and conservation. Because our land was crossroad for every war cruisers and conquerors there cannot be reached precise number of builded sacral temples through the centuries, but there is some middle age statistic preserved by the Turks who were invaders here for 5 centuries until 1914, where is stated for ex. that Bitola(Monastir(Heraclea L.)) in one time had 100 Churches, Skopje(Uskub(Scupi)) had 50 Churches and Ohrid(Ohri(Lichnid(Dassaretis))) in one time has had 365 Churches and Monasteries - one for each day in the year...



MACEDONIA is land of natural and cultural abundance, place where one can meet the true harmony of embody of world cultures, where are united east and west, prehistoric and new age, ancient and modern, Christianity and Islam, Orthodoxy and Catholicism, sweet and bitter, fine and rustic, high and down, warm and cold, intact peaceful nature and strangely determinate noisy urbanism...  all this is due to the central position in the world as geographically so as culturally and geopolitically, here are joined European, Asian and African tectonic plates, here are positioned worlds crossroads as culturally so as politically, place where You can find plenty cultural diversity - recognised officially, place where were started or was witness of all world wars and world conquerors, place inspirit by the Sun by huge amounts of its essence thus pointing directly to the cradle of the world and maybe to permanent solution for sustainable future and fuel for cosmic exploring! 


.


To be precise in Macedonia there are plenty sites of undiscovered or for centuries untouched nature among other resented by 364 registered caves for full year discovery opportunities, also there are 4485 archaeological sites detected, spanning from eneolith till middle ages from which only 2% are fully explored and conserved (one archeological site on every 5 km2) (source archaeological map 1996 MANU - not updated) spectacular localities such as neolithic sites rich of Magna Mater figurines and figures or for ex. oldest male figure ever found in the world Adam of Macedonia(one of the world's ten most important archaeological finds) , Ceramic Round Seal 6.000 BC, stonehenge like Megalithic Observatory Kokino, ritual tombs and Macedonian mummy’s, also plenty ancient localities with spas and amphitheaters or 130 early Christian conserved Basilicas with most beautiful mosaics masterpieces of early Christian art, and all of those sites are rich with stunning artefacts such as neolithic fibulas, ancient coaches, 4th century wood carvings or only discovered early Christian Terracotta Icons from Vinica etc. Also paleontology in Macedonia has been revived lately, unveiling stunning facts “Located outside the village of Stamer, near Delcovo, the fossils bear witness that antelopes, prehistoric rhinoceroses, saber-toothed tigers, and mastodons once lived on Europe's soil, as well as the giraffe.”

.                  - Neolithic Seals from Macedonia -   


MUSEUMS IN MACEDONIA ? is there any need cause whole country is one big museum full of hidden stories and artifacts, full of rituals and events, full of simplicity and complicity... (if one likes to explore deeply trough the cultural and natural stratums he could ask for professional guidance from travel agencies which in most cases have licensed tour guiders but also can ask for profesional assistence from some association or contact some ngo as MACAR)  then again there can be found (in every town in Macedonia) various museums of closed type which are running full time, with options for outdoor presentations by museum curator usually organized for large groups...



In addition, there are events all year around



Also there are many Sport events all year round such as Macedonian Open Tennis Tournament, Ohrid Swimming Marathon, Sharplanina Ski Cup, Mavrovo Snowboard Cup, Skopje International Marathon, Skopje Swim Meet, Tour de Macedoine, Macedonian Paragliding Cup, Macedonian Climbing Cup, and normally every year we are hosts of some World or Europian sport event but also there are Country Championships in every sport trough the year... [1][2]
 



Edited by beTon - 23-Jul-2017 at 17:56
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  Quote beTon Quote  Post ReplyReply #6 Posted: 30-Aug-2008 at 20:21


Originally posted by UrbanFreak

WOW beTon, great pictures. The one from Ohrid and the mountains are master pieces.

Thumbs%20Up This one goes to ones that shot those pics, is funny how amater photography promotes our country, but still there is plenty pro photography which is kept in bunkers of MTV(mac tv) and also in MOC(Ministry of Culture) and also there are few advertising agencies which held big libraries of domestic views...



Edited by beTon - 03-Jun-2012 at 15:00
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  Quote beTon Quote  Post ReplyReply #7 Posted: 06-Feb-2009 at 23:32

Culture of MACEDONIA - www.everyculture.com/Ja-Ma/Macedonia.html

CULTURE NAME: Macedonian

ALTERNATIVE NAMES: Makedonski, Slavo-Macedonian

ORIENTATION

Identification. The ancient Macedonians were considered non-Greek but are claimed as co-nationals by the modern Greeks. Modern Macedonians are Slavs descended from the peoples who arrived in the Balkans in the sixth and seventh centuries. There are six ethnic groups: Miyak, Brsyak, Southern, Struma-Mesta, Macedo-Shop, and Upper Vardar.

Location and Geography. Macedonia is a land-locked nation located in southeastern Europe. The current border runs along mountain chains that separate the republic from Bulgaria, Greece, Albania, and Kosovo and Serbia. Macedonia is slightly larger than the state of Vermont with a total area of 9,781 square miles (25,333 square kilometers). The country consists mostly of mountains separated by flat river valleys. The capital, Skopje, is the largest city.

Demography. In 1994, the population was 1,945,932. The population in that year was 67 percent Macedonian, 22 percent Albanian, and 4 percent Turkish, with smaller numbers of Roms (Gypsies), Vlahs (Aromanians), Serbs, Muslims, and others. The number of Macedonians in neighboring states is difficult to determine.

Linguistic Affiliation. Macedonian is a South Slavic language in the Indo-European family whose closest relatives are Bulgarian and Serbian. There is a major east-west dialectal division and about twenty subdivisions. Macedonian evolved in contact with non-Slavic languages such as Greek, Albanian, Aromanian, and Turkish. During the Ottoman period, multilingualism was the norm, but today young Macedonian speakers are more likely to know English than the other national languages. Multilingualism is common in urban areas but is less common in rural areas.

Symbolism. The unsuccessful Saint Elijah's Day (Ilinden) uprising of 1903 is the organizing metaphor of statehood. The Macedonian Peoples Republic (with Macedonian as the official language) was established in 1944. The sarcophagus of Gotse Delchev in a church in Skopje is near the site of a ceremonial commemoration that includes fireworks, picnics, and folk dancing. The national anthem refers to the sun of freedom, the struggle for rights, and the heroes of Ilinden. The first flag used after independence, featuring a yellow sixteen-pointed symbol in the center of a red field, was based on a symbol found at the presumed burial site of Philip of Macedon in Greek Macedonia in 1977. The use of this symbol infuriated the Greeks, and in 1995 the Macedonian parliament adopted a flag with a yellow circle with eight rays projecting to the edge of a red field. Other metaphors of community include "Mother Macedonia," "heart of the Balkans," and "oasis of peace."

HISTORY AND ETHNIC RELATIONS

Emergence of the Nation. Byzantine documents indicate that the Slavs of Macedonia were a distinct group in the early medieval period, and Slavic dialects from Macedonia are identifiable from early Slavic documents. The modern national movement emerged in the nineteenth century. Although many Macedonians self-identified as Greeks, Bulgarians, or Serbs, a distinct sense of national identity developed from a sense of linguistic difference from Bulgarian and Serbian. Owing to Greek, Serbian, and Bulgarian territorial claims, Macedonian claims to nationhood were ignored until the end of World War II, when a Macedonian republic was established within the Yugoslav federation. That republic adopted an independent constitution on 17 November 1991.

National Identity. At the beginning of the nineteenth century the primary source of identity was religion, but the focus shifted to language before the end of the century. As the modern Bulgarian and Serbian literary languages took shape, Macedonians attempted to create a literary language based on their speech, but Macedonian did not receive official recognition until 1944. It is claimed that a Macedonian national identity arose during World War II to keep Yugoslavian Macedonia separate from Bulgaria, but there is documentation that the development of a national identity was indigenous in the nineteenth century.

Ethnic Relations. Ethnic Macedonians live in contiguous parts of Bulgaria, Greece, and Albania, and Muslim speakers of Slavic dialects classifiable as Macedonian who consider themselves to have a separate ethnicity (Goran) live in Kosovo and Albania. Albania recognizes as Macedonian only the Christians living in its southeast, omitting the Macedonian-speaking Muslim and Christian population of the eastern highlands and the Gorans. In 1999, Bulgaria recognized the independent existence of the Macedonian literary language, but in return Macedonia has renounced support for the Macedonian minority in Bulgaria. Greece claims to have no national minorities and thus does not recognize the existence of its Macedonian minority. In Greek EU-funded minority language projects, Macedonian has never been included. Within Macedonia, religion is as important an organizing principle as language: Most Macedonians, Serbs, and Aromanians (Vlahs) are Christian, and most Albanians, Turks, and Rom are Muslim. The national culture is identified with the Macedonian Orthodox Church, and Macedonian-speaking Muslims are divided among those who self-identify as Macedonians on the basis of language and those who self-identify as Muslims.

URBANISM, ARCHITECTURE, AND THE USE OF SPACE

The traditional culture is rural, but today more than 60 percent of the population is urban, with a quarter of the national residents living in metropolitan Skopje. Traditional architectural influences are Mediterranean, Byzantine, and Ottoman. Modern high-rise apartment blocks have a balcony, which often is used for storage and clothes drying. A traditional Muslim household has separate rooms for male and female guests, whereas a Christian house has a single room. In older urban neighborhoods, individual single-story rooms open into a central courtyard. Wealthier traditional urban houses have one or more upper stories projecting over the street. Urban areas are characterized by a historical center with an open bazaar. Skopje was almost entirely destroyed by an earthquake in 1963. The old main train station, torn in half with its clock stopped at the moment of the quake, was reinforced and left standing as a monument to the disaster. Many public monuments commemorate those fallen in World War II or Ilinden. Since 1991, many villages have restored or built new churches or mosques.

FOOD AND ECONOMY

Food in Daily Life. Breakfast is eaten around nine a.m. by workers in offices, but earlier by factory workers, and in the field in the country. Dinner is the main meal and is eaten at around two p.m. Supper is eaten later after the afternoon siesta. Meals are prepared immediately before consumption, although they may include leftovers. Hot food often is allowed to cool to room temperature. Breakfast can consist of bread and cheese, sometimes with eggs. Other meals can begin with meze (appetizers) served with rakia (fruit brandy). Bean casserole (tavche-gravche) is the national dish, and bread is considered the most basic food. In restaurants, pizza is especially popular. Hotel restaurants are popular venues for banquets, and there are many private restaurants. There are no food taboos other than those associated with religion, but folk beliefs about food abound.

Food Customs at Ceremonial Occasions. Among Christians, a bird is eaten for Christmas, and lamb for Easter. Among Muslims, a lamb is slaughtered for Kurban Bayram. At Christmas Eve dinner it is traditional to serve a cake with a coin in it. Sweet desserts are associated with religious holidays, New Year's Day, births, weddings, and funerals and commemorations. Blaga rakia (hot sugared fruit brandy) is served by the parents of the groom the morning after the wedding night if the bride is found to have been a virgin.

Basic Economy. The traditional economy was agricultural and pastoral. The nation is now industrialized and has been integrated in international trade.

Land Tenure and Property. Traditionally, land was held in common by the extended family, which was patrilocal and was defined patrilineally. After the division of property, wells and threshing floors often continued to be used collectively. Each village has a boundary that is the basic level of property division above that of the family. During the communist period, private property rights were restricted.

Commercial Activities. Cash crops include sugar beets, sunflowers, cotton, rice, tobacco, grains, fruits and vegetables, opium poppies, wine, livestock, dairy products, fish, and hardwoods. There is a tourist industry and a traditional crafts industry.

Major Industries. Steel, cement, mining, textiles, pharmaceuticals, petroleum products, and furniture making are the largest industries.

Trade. Exports include food products, tobacco, pharmaceuticals, and textiles. Serbia was the major trading partner before the imposition of international sanctions. Other important major trading partners include the former Yugoslav republics, other Balkan states, and the European Union.

Division of Labor. Labor is primarily based on agriculture, mining, and light industry. There were about one million persons in the labor force in 1998. In 1996, 38.8 percent of the labor force could not find employment. The minimum age of employment is fifteen years.

SOCIAL STRATIFICATION

Classes and Castes. Differences in the distribution of wealth have increased since 1991, with Roms at the bottom. Other social differences result from differences between urban and rural populations. Serbs and Aromanians are well integrated into the economy, while Albanians are underrepresented in the state sector.

Symbols of Social Stratification. Ethnicity is more important than class. Dress and behavior are likely to follow ethnic lines, although national costumes and articles of clothing have become less common as a result of increasing urbanization and modernization.

POLITICAL LIFE

Government. Macedonia is a parliamentary democracy. Macedonia's unicameral assembly of one-hundred twenty seats is called the Sobranje. The executive branch consists of the President (elected by popular vote) and the Council of Ministers (elected by the majority vote of all the deputies in the Sobranje).

Leadership and Political Officials. Political parties tend to follow ethnic lines and draw their leaders from educated elites. The main exceptions are parties led by former communists, which tend to be multiethnic. Personal connections are an important aspect of political life.

Social Problems and Control. The revision of the legal system after the communist period is not complete. Police brutality can take on ethnic overtones. Albanians are significantly underrepresented in the upper ranks of the security structure. The lack of independence of the judiciary from the political system is a perceived problem. Informal social control involves the family, gossip, saving face, and the threat of vengeance. Violent crime is rare.

Military Activity. The army is small and has outdated equipment, although it is in the process of modernizing, especially since 1999. Macedonia's security has been guaranteed by international troops since January 1993. The most important military activity is protecting the country's borders.

SOCIAL WELFARE AND CHANGE PROGRAMS

The state provides social welfare to needy families and grants pensions to retirees.

NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS AND OTHER ASSOCIATIONS

Macedonia has numerous foreign and domestic nongovernmental organizations. The boundaries between local organizations, cultural associations, and political parties is fluid.

GENDER ROLES AND STATUSES

Division of Labor by Gender. Men and women work outside the home, but women are responsible for most domestic labor. In academia, men dominate in the sciences and engineering, whereas women are more visible in the humanities.

The Relative Status of Women and Men. In principle, the genders are equal. In practice, men have higher status, and women are likely to manage the household. Women occupy some positions of power but their representation is not in proportion to their numbers.

MARRIAGE, FAMILY, AND KINSHIP

Marriage. Traditionally, marriages were arranged by the parents, but today young people are likely to choose their own partners. Pregnancy often leads to marriage among urban youth, but in the traditional culture the bride is expected to be a virgin. Traditional marriages usually do not cross religious lines. Polygyny occasionally occurs among Muslims. Marriage is the norm, and adults who have never been married are rare. Divorce and remarriage are regulated by civil law.

Domestic Unit. The traditional unit is the patrilocal extended family consisting of a married couple, their unmarried daughters, and their sons with their own spouses and children. This is becoming increasingly less common in urban areas. Children tend to live with their parents until they are married.

Inheritance. Traditionally, inheritance goes through the male line except for what women take with them as a dowry. Today children inherit equally or by assignment.

Kin Groups. Traditionally, above the level of the family or extended family there was the exogamous clan. In rural areas, a clan often constituted a hamlet within a village. The church, however, allows intraclan marriage after three generations.

SOCIALIZATION

Infant Care. Infants are swaddled and carried, and sleep in cradles. They do not have separate play spaces. In urban areas, sleeping and playing arrangements depend on the space available.

Child Rearing and Education. Children are looked after by their mothers, grandmothers, neighbors, or older siblings. Children play freely at an early age. Boys are expected to be more active than girls. In urban areas there are also nursery schools and kindergartens. Eight-year elementary education is compulsory.

Higher Education. Society places a high value on higher education, but ethnic minorities are under-represented. Approximately 87 percent of those holding university degrees are ethnic Macedonians.

ETIQUETTE

In the traditional culture, the young show deference to the old. It is normal for male friends to shake hands and for women to kiss when meeting and saying good-bye. A person entering a room where others are seated will shake hands with each person. Physical contact among friends of the same gender is considered normal. Although staring at strangers was once common, it became relatively rare in the 1990s. It once was the norm to remove one's shoes at the entrance of a home, but this practice is receding among urban Christians.

RELIGION

Religious Beliefs. The major religions are Orthodox Christianity (66 percent) and Islam (30 percent), with small groups of Roman Catholics, Protestants, and atheists. Most Jews were deported and killed by the Nazis, but a few still live in Macedonia. Belief in the evil eye is widespread, and religious practices in rural areas often reflect folk beliefs.

Rituals and Holy Places. Rituals take place at the church or mosque, at the cemetery, in the village, and at home. The most important holidays are Christmas and Easter for Christians and Ramadan and Kurban Bayram for Muslims. Among the Rom, Saint George's Day on 6 May is the major holiday. The Aromanians celebrate 20 May as the Day of the Vlahs, to commemorate the Ottoman recognition of a separate Aromanian church (and therefore millet "nationality") in 1905. Among the customs still practiced are the lighting of bonfires and the singing of special songs on Christmas Eve. Traditionally on the Feast of the Epiphany, a cross is thrown into a major body of water to bless it for the new year.

Death and the Afterlife. Relatives visit the grave on the third, ninth, and fortieth days after the burial; after six months; and after the first year to mourn, give out food, light candles and incense, and pour libations of water or wine. An unmarried young person is buried dressed for a wedding. Among folk beliefs are various practices to prevent a corpse from becoming a vampire.

MEDICINE AND HEALTH CARE

Medicine is modern, but there are also the traditional folk healers, normally old women, who deal with mysterious illnesses such as warts and maladies caused by the evil eye.

SECULAR CELEBRATIONS

Official holidays include the New Year on 1 and 2 January, Orthodox Christmas on 7 January, Easter Monday, the International Day of Labor on 1 and 2 May, Saint Elijah's Day on 2 August, Macedonian Independence Day on 8 September, and the Day of the Uprising of the Macedonian People on 11 October to commemorate World War II.

THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES

Support for the Arts. The arts are supported by the state through the Macedonian Academy of Arts and Sciences, institutions of higher learning, and public theaters. Despite its small size, Macedonia boasts thirteen active professional theater groups that average over sixteen hundred total performances per year, a philharmonic orchestra (established in 1944), six chamber ensembles, and a host of annual folk music festivals.

Literature. Modern Macedonian literature made its appearance during the late 1800s with the poetry of the brothers Dimitar and Konstantin Miladinov, whose works are still recited by students. The growing literary collection grounded in the current, or codified, standards of the Macedonian language, on the other hand, marks its beginning with the 1939 publication of Kosta Racin's programmatic collection of poems entitled Beli Mugri (White Dawns). While most of the distinguished nineteenth and early twentieth century literary figures were poets, since the end of World War II there has been an increase in the number of prose writers and playwrights.

Graphic Arts. Villagers in Macedonia are known for their weaving of colorful blankets and carpets. Gold and silversmiths are plentiful in the bazaars of larger cities, and stomnari, or urn-makers, still produce glazed terra cotta utensils such as urns, pitchers, cups, and bowls.

Performance Arts. Since gaining independence, Macedonia has produced a number of promising film directors whose pictures have acquired international recognition and praise. The film Before the Rain, for example, was nominated in 1994 by the American Film Academy for the Best Foreign Language Film Award. It had already won the Golden Lion award at the Venice Film Festival.

THE STATE OF THE PHYSICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

The Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, founded in 1967 at Skopje, has sections of biological and medical sciences and of mathematical and technical sciences. The country also has an Association of the Sciences and Arts, founded in 1960 at Bitola, as well as specialized learned societies concerned with physics, pharmacy, geology, medicine, mathematics and computers, veterinary surgery, engineering, forestry, and agriculture. Macedonia has research institutes dealing with geology, natural history, cotton, animal breeding, tobacco, animal husbandry, and water development.

The University of Skopje (founded in 1949) has faculties of civil engineering, agriculture, veterinary medicine, forestry, medicine, pharmacy, mechanical engineering, electrotechnical engineering, technology and metallurgy, natural and mathematical sciences, stomatology, and geology and mining. Between 1987 and 1997 science and engineering students accounted for 47 percent of university enrollment. During that same period, Macedonia had 1,335 scientists and engineers and 546 technicians per million people engaged in research and development. The Natural History Museum of Macedonia (founded 1926) is located in Skopje.

There are many informations lacking in this precise article but this can be found trough already posted links in previous posts. I will just suggest correct info on few wrong statements here, first one is about the part on alternative names, yes slavo-macedonian is alternative name but used by greeks, and also there is new update on the holidays which can be found here www.public-holidays.com/holidays_2009_106.htm also new year and may day are now celebrated for one day.

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  Quote Max Quote  Post ReplyReply #8 Posted: 08-Sep-2011 at 13:41
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  Quote Max Quote  Post ReplyReply #9 Posted: 13-Sep-2011 at 21:33

Phrase Book - http://www.the-backpacking-site.com/countries/macedonia-phrase.html

Import regulations by Macedonia customs - http://jrdtravel.visaheadquarters.co.uk/custom_view.php?country=Macedonia

Macedonia Technical Information for Travelers

Macedonia Voltage: 220 V
Macedonia Electrical Frequency: 50 Hz
Macedonia Plug: C or F
Macedonia DVD Region: 2
Macedonia Blu-ray Region: B
Macedonia GSM Frequency: GSM 900

http://www.voltageplugregion.com/macedonia-technical-information-for-travelers.html


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  Quote Max Quote  Post ReplyReply #10 Posted: 13-Sep-2011 at 22:32

Cultural Tours, Eco and Rural Tours, Spiritual Vacations, Wildlife Viewing and Safari Vacations, Hiking and Trekking Tours, Wine Roads, Cycling Tours, Flying Tours(Skydiving, Balloon Rides, Hang Gliding, Para Gliding, Glider Rides)...

for local sites seeing, the prices for tourist guiding are not expensive at all and can be argued through bargaining, or even better arranged in front with some of the licensed tour guides [1][2][3] that are obligatory for groups beyond 10 persons, other cross country arrangements that include transport and accommodation are +-100euro as standard per person, although there are always exceptions for groups or obvious hitchhikers I would strongly suggest always go with licensed guides or tour operators coz you'll be insured as physically so as culturally, it is not obligatory though, and in many cases local people can become excellent guides that will offer more that sightseer info, still dont look for them on the first street corner, maybe on net-community or some place like local hostels, where others can guarantee for the spend time!

dont be mislead by prices of foreign tour operators, as are listed on intentionally imputed links in this post, as spiritual vacations and wildlife tours, coz ours and their expenses are two different worlds, first of all they work from distance but also have in mind that our standard is far from european, so local tour prices are pretty acceptable, if not cheap-dirt in comparison with rest of europe!

http://www.travelvideostore.com/europe/macedonia-travel-videos/




Edited by Max - 18-Jun-2012 at 12:55
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  Quote Max Quote  Post ReplyReply #11 Posted: 28-Sep-2011 at 21:08
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  Quote Max Quote  Post ReplyReply #12 Posted: 20-Apr-2012 at 18:33


   

Situated at an altitude of 1330 meters (about 4000 ft) above the sea level, Krushevo is the highest town not only in the Republic of Macedonia, but also in the Balkans. Krushevo is laid on Bushava Mountain, about 30 km away from Prilep. It is a well-known winter ski center and a climatic health resort. Its old architecture, many hotels, and all conditions necessary for pleasant winter holidays, make Krushevo an ideal place for relaxation. Mentioned in documents from the 15th century, Krushevo is a living museum, famous for its traditional architecture, cultural sites, and legacy as the site of the great 1903 Ilinden uprising against Ottoman domination. The rebellion failed, but its memory is cherished in Macedonia even today, as a symbol of the national struggle for freedom and democracy; while it lasted only 10 days, the Krusevo Republic of revolutionary leader Nikola Karev represented a desire for self-rule under a modern European political system. Today an enormous monument ILINDEN also known as MAKEDONIUM on the hill above Krusevo marks the elusive dream of the Ilinden revolutionaries. http://www.atlas-travel.mk/incoming/en/2Krushevo.aspx

   










Edited by Max - 23-Jul-2017 at 17:39
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  Quote Max Quote  Post ReplyReply #13 Posted: 21-Apr-2012 at 16:17

The region of Mariovo is located in the southern part of the Republic of Macedonia, in the mountains of Nidze and Selecka. The climate is mountainous and the nature is especially attractive in spring with thousands of colourful and fragrant mountain flowers, medicinal herbs and teas which give this place special beauty and attraction. Besides the amount of archaeological sites and cultural-historical heritage from all periods, the region offers excellent possibilities for the development of cattle breeding, beekeeping, village tourism and hunter tourism, wood industry, and the production of healthy food. http://www.macedoniavision.com/Default.aspx?id=bf7e767b-918c-42da-b4ee-57807780fd48&menuID=1&lmid=1&mnlv1=3&mnlv2=5&mnlv3=3




http://www.summitpost.org/mariovo/614872 [1][2][3]


from ethnology of Mariovo Best known is the local female costume, which is among the richest Macedonian colorful folk costumes. It is interesting that Mariovska Nosija (wedding dress) weighs 48 kg... http://www.mariovo.mk/en.html [1]


Edited by Max - 23-Jul-2017 at 16:05
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  Quote Max Quote  Post ReplyReply #14 Posted: 22-Apr-2012 at 00:11




Traditional costumes today are rare, and could be seen mostly at traditional holidays and weddings, and normally in the ethnographic museums with largest collections in National Museum of Macedonia and local museums from village Podmocani in Prespa region and village Rezanovce in Kumanovo region, also costumes can be found at folklore ensembles across country.

Macedonian Folk Costumes - http://macedonia.auburn.edu/folk-embroidery/malahova.php
Macedonian Folk Embroidery - http://macedonia.auburn.edu/folk-embroidery/index.php
 + http://www.promacedonia.org/rami/am/index.html

Traditional Macedonian Costumes
http://issuu.com/canc3r/docs/makedonski_kontinuitet/80


The traditional folk costumes embrace traits of the various cultures represented in this part of the Balkan. They convey the skill and inventiveness of native designers - Macedonian women, who manufactured themselves their outfits of homespun thread (usually wool, linen, cotton, hemp), using traditional tools. Until the early decades of the 20th century, when folk costumes reached their peak and were still widely worn and adorned, there were over 70 different kinds of richly decorated costumes on the territory of Macedonia. Every region had its distinctive attire, which differed from the clothing of the adjacent region in its stylistic, aesthetic and functional features. The reason for the appearance of so many different costumes, particularly for women, is the geographic isolation of the ethic areas, as well as frequent migrations and ethnic diversity of the population.

The features that make traditional costumes magnificent are the embroidery (in rich geometric and geometricized floral patterns), appliqués, woven ornaments, adornment with fringes, fine metal thread - srma, and braids, as well as jewelry, made of metal, beads and fruits of the nature.Two main types of costumes western Macedonian and eastern Macedonian. The western Macedonian type includes the Upper Vardar Valley, the Debar-Miyak and Brsyak etnographic areas.Traditional costumes in these parts of Macedonia are characterized by the numerous pieces of clothing, made mostly of white klashna, as well as the various headdresses and rich prevailing red colors. The versatile application of numerous old embroidery techniques (in woolen, silk or metal thread), the embellishment with braids, filigree ornaments and numerous pieces with beads and precious jewelry, made mostly of metal, give an extraordinary structure and visual effect.


The eastern Macedonia type includes: the Middle Vardar Valley, and the Shop ethographic area.The costumes from these regions are generally lighter and rather plain, without massive jewelry, exquisite decoration and lively colors. Red is the prevalent color, and other decoration includes variegated cords, braids, bands and srma.



Later  at the end of XIX century and beginning of XX century there is new fashion in towns, more like fancy  town costumes which are covered in Bitola Museum exibition. They are divided into male and female attires. According to the influences prevalent at the time they were worn, they are grouped into two  types, first "Ala Turka" where oriental influence was dominant, and the  second type "Ala Franga" with its dominant European elements. A special place is given to the items that are actual continuations of ancient-Balkan influences. The fund of these museum items counts 120.  http://www.bitolamuseum.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=112:2010-09-22-10-23-55&catid=44:2010-09-28-19-22-55&Itemid=93&lang=en
  http://www.bitolamuseum.org/Ethnology_Department/



Edited by Max - 23-Jul-2017 at 18:15
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  Quote Max Quote  Post ReplyReply #15 Posted: 23-Apr-2012 at 13:12

Jewellery has a particular place in the Macedonian folk arts as an integral part of the national costumes together with embroidery, representing its most decorative features. Made of various materials (gold, silver, copper, pearls) and done with the help of different techniques (casting, filigree work, granulation, engraving) the jewellery is rich in forms, very decorative and in harmony with their national costumes. Macedonian jewellery can be found in the well known centres of fillgree craft; Bitola, Ohrid, Struga, Skopje, from where valuable hand-made products are dispersed all over Macedonia. Some samples of this jewelery are real masterpieces of filigree craft with old preserved forms and elements. Especially outstanding, with rich ornamention is the jewellery found on formal women's gowns from Skopska Crna Gora, Skopska Blatija, Struska and the Ohrid, Marko and Prilep valleys, giving particular artistic effect to their national costumes. Besides metal jewellery one can find different ornaments, knitted in pearls in the eastern part of Macedonia. Pearl jewellery is special hand-work with peculiarly rich and stylistic motifs. Different metal objects for everyday use, made by blacksmiths are artistically formed and richly decorated with various dishes of copper and brass, with rich ornament hand engravings done by coppersmiths are found in almost all towns in Macedonia, (especially in Prilep, Ohrid, Krusevo and Skopje)...

handcrafts of Filigree and Sedef(pearl shell)[1][2][3] can be found at old-bazaars in Bitola, Krusevo, Ohrid, Prilep, Struga, Tetovo and mostly in Skopska Carsija in the kiosks
on Goldsmith street[1][2][3] or through handcraft associations as http://www.matacraft.org.mk/artisan-portfolios/ or can be purchased online http://www.talimo.com/category/macedonian-filigrees/
The Old Bazaar is most famous for its well-known Goldsmith Street. Shops line both sides, offering fine gold and silver for sale. You can find all sorts of jewelry, including earrings, rings, bracelets, necklaces, and the world famous butterfly brooch. Many of the designs are completely unique and intricately worked into unusual shapes and styles. One of the very special things to discover here is the ancient art of silver filigree, which has been preserved and perfected in Macedonia over the course of many centuries. Shops are filled with filigree jewelry, especially brooches, and personal articles such as purses and boxes. Macedonian filigree is prized the world over... http://makstack.com/2010/03/26/old-bazaar/


In  Christianity, the metamorphosis a butterfly undergoes is symbolic of the spiritual evolution all Christians go through. In ancient mythology, the butterfly stands for wisdom and everlasting knowledge. The butterfly as a part of the jewelry dates back to the end of the 19 th century. It has been made according to the traditional Macedonian brooch and represents the most exquisite filigree work of the member of Ohrid Handicraftsmen School from the end of the 19 th and the beginning of the 20 th century. It has been made in a hard technique of filigree work, spinning round several thin handmade silver stripes into one remarkable whole. This kind of manufacture could be afforded only by the masters, wealthy tradesmen and other rich people from that period.



Edited by Max - 23-Jul-2017 at 18:30
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  Quote Max Quote  Post ReplyReply #16 Posted: 24-Apr-2012 at 15:12

Macedonian Traditional Instruments

Macedonian folk instruments can be broadly classified into two main groups: traditional and oriental instruments.

Gayda, kaval, supelka, duduk, zurla, dvoyanka, kemene, different kinds of tambura, tapan and def  are generally considered traditional instruments. 
With slight variations, garneta (clarinet), violin, oud, laout, canon and tarabuka and/or daire are typically part of the oriental instrumental ensembles called Chalgii.



The traditional instruments are used in various combinations
- Gayda (bagpipe) is inherent to the Macedonian musical culture, particularly villages -[1][1][1][1][1]
- Tambura is also considered a traditional instrument, although it was brought to Macedonia in the XIV and XV century by the Turks -[2]
Kaval is typical macedonian flute instrument with unique sound, the Kaval and Supelka have traditionally been regarded as shepherds instruments. -[3][3][3]
  
Above three instruments often are played together
 with some percussion instrument (tapance/daire/tarabuka)  
- Zurla / TAPan are typically heard at weddings and other social occasions on which people entertain by performing folk dances -[4][4][4]    

Macedonian traditional music has ubber-clasicall Size -[1][2][3][4][5]


...


Another interesting genre in the Macedonian musical culture is Chalgiya. In Macedonia, calgiya present an ensemble which employs instruments of persian-arabian origin tho as such earlier largely influenced by its byzantine neighbors, anyway in middle ages it became some sort universal balkan pop-music, variation of the traditional music spread through oriental ensembles that flourished mostly in the larger towns.  
today Calgiya is a typical old-town music i.e. "starogradska muzika", already having long tradition in towns, notably Veles, Ohrid, Bitola and Salonika...
As style chalgiya carries strong oriental influence, as reflected in the playing style, however in the course of time, the calgiya music in Macedonia developed its specific tonal dialect and expression -[5][5][5][5][5], which later got further modifications eg. in Egean Macedonia where is combined with brass orchestras -[5], or today as crossover with traditional instruments -[5]  
Chalgiya ensembles were and are welcomed at weddings, religious celebration rituals (Christmas, Epiphany, Easter etc), holidays and fairs etc.






Edited by Max - 15-Mar-2017 at 14:56
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  Quote Max Quote  Post ReplyReply #17 Posted: 07-May-2012 at 22:03

In this place musical tradition has long roots, as long as human civilization which is confirmed by discovery of neolithic globular flute in village Mramor [1][2][3][4][5]



Macedonian music is often described as being a product of its unique geographical position, “a crossroads between East and West”. Although slightly cliched, this description is nevertheless quite appropriate. Situated towards the Eastern edge of Europe it was also under Turkish domination for 500 years until the beginning of this century and that influence is strongly felt in Macedonia’s rich and varied musical traditions.

The closest other National style would be the music from the bordering country of Bulgaria, particularly that from the Pirin region. Music of course does not obey politically imposed boundaries, and so the music of Eastern Macedonia and Western Bulgaria is alike, because is one and same ethnographic region. A distinctive aspect of the macedonian music is the of time signatures and internal groupings such as 7/8, 9/8, 11/8, 5/8, 12/8, 13/8, 18/8, etc. Particularly 7/8 is very commonly used.

Macedonian music is a modal drone-based music, however in XX century with the introduction of instruments such as accordion and guitar, and the influence of Western music the same melodies have been given a more harmonic backdrop. This Western harmonic approach has been an accepted practice for sometime.

The use of more traditional Macedonian instruments such as gaida (Macedonian bagpipe), kaval (end-blown flute), tapan (double-headed bass drum) and tambura (long-necked lute) is becoming rarer, however it is still possible to find among the older men in the community a small number who can play the gaida. This is not to say that there is no interest in the traditional instruments which are now mainly found in the villages, but they have gradually been replaced by modern instruments. The music is intrinsically linked with dance as there has always been a strong folk dance tradition, and much of the music accompanies the folk dances. This tradition of community participative dancing is still strong and very much alive. There is also a rich vocal tradition...
http://www.linseypollak.com/macedonian-folk-music-cd/



This musical tradition has grown through ages cultivating and sophisticating its musical expression until has reached own culmination in the middle ages i.e. own classicism, and this days was best represented to the world by the virtuous Pece Atanasovski [1][2][3] The bagpiper Pece Atanasovski was winner at the World Festival in Sicily in 1968, in a competition of 1,800 bag-pipers from around the world. Atanasovski has also won first prizes in 16 other international festivals (Llangollen, Dijon, Nancy, Oslo, Leyden, Bracciano), and has lectured on original Macedonian folklore at over 90 universities around the world. One of his own masterpieces composed of macedonian musical motifs is Janino Oro [1][2][3][4][5]




Macedonian Traditional Music is famous by its cheerful sounds and complex rhythms followed by improvised melody(called ezgija) and syncopated beats [1][2] for what we are known as true and native jazzers, improvising long before jazz was born as we know it today, and although musical improvisation around is not so uncommon, in the past in our yard became standard of everyday life existence because as people we had to be very adaptive to our geo-crossroad position but in same time standing firmly on our roots...   notable present-day representative of macedonian music between jazzers was Tale Ognenovski [1][2][3]
   


Edited by Max - 15-Mar-2017 at 15:27
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  Quote Max Quote  Post ReplyReply #18 Posted: 08-May-2012 at 00:41

nowadays among best performers of our musical echoes are Orchestra Pece Atanasovski [1][2][3], Stefce Stojkovski Orchestra [1][2][3][4][5], Kaldrma [1][2][3][4][5] and many other...

but also there are etno-classic crossover interpreters like Dragan Dautovski [1], Anastasia [1], Synthesis [1], Baklava [1], Monistra [1], Ljubojna [1], Petar Rendzov [1]

all in all dont miss to listen our folklore! best place to be heard and seen is every year in may or june at Dolneni Festival http://www.culture.in.mk/story.asp?id=7075&rub=55 [1][2] and if not live on festivals, squares, concerts or in gardens, parks or mountains, then ask for any recording that your host may have and enjoy while visiting the country! but have in mind that our traditional music later has became affected by XX c. instruments which are heavly changing the original sound, so look up rather for traditional instrument orchestras instead of electric or eclectic like most of the numbered on following link [1] although if songs are played by pros still sounds quite good [1][2] but not as pure as traditional interpretations [3][4][5]

Edited by Max - 18-May-2012 at 11:56
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  Quote Max Quote  Post ReplyReply #19 Posted: 16-May-2012 at 19:11





Oro - Traditional Dance
http://www.europafilmtreasures.eu/PY/263/see-the-film-rhythm_and_sound [1]

Could it be that there was a single original dance from which all of them evolved?...
I am sure that one of the original dances, after feet stomping or walking, was the simple: 'step, step, step, do something, step, do something' Macedonian "Pravo Oro."...
As different villages adopted some of the steps, they added their own styling and steps to finally incorporate them into more complex and varied patterns. http://www.phantomranch.net/folkdanc/articles/balkan_dances.htm


Macedonian dances are exotic by flow and exceptional by steps supported with rhythms of Macedonian music [1][2][3][4][5]
except on weddings and public meetings, dances today are mostly performed as cultural shows which are slowly but surly moving the traditional dance oro to museum artifact instead of every day act, but in times of aggressive glottalization one can be glad that still there is way to learn and experience Macedonian Ora's which are "cultivated" by many dance ensembles in the country among whom Tanec is oldest, most prominent and rewarded [1][2][3][4][5]

famous men dances
Cucuk Oro [1][2][3][4][5]
Kopacko Oro [1][2][3]
Maskoto Oro [1][2][3][4][5] south macedonian dance counterpart to Teskoto from north
Rusalisko Oro [1][2][3][4][5]
Oro Cifte Camce [1][2][3]
Oro Krstach [1][2][3][4][5]
Osogovsko Oro [1][2[3][4][5]                    
Teskoto Oro [1][2][3]



famous mingled dances
Pirin Flower [1][2] - (3)(4)
Potrcano Oro [1][2][3]Sitna Lisa [1][2][3]
Zaramo [1][2][3][4][5][6][7]



famous woman dances
Krsteno Oro [1][2][3][4][5] Baptized Dance
Kucano Oro [1][2][3][4][5] Wedding Dance also known as Pusteno Oro or Bairace or Zensko Berance [1][2][3]
Mariovska Tresenica [1][2][3][4][5] Tremble Dance inspired by customs that women performed on Clean Monday before the Great Lent 
Nevestinsko Oro [1][2][3][4][5] Bridal Dance known as Zensko Chamche womans counterpart to Teskoto
Paidusko Oro [1][2][3]                            
Potrculka [1][2][3]
Svekrvino Oro [1][2][3]
Zensko Oro Krivoto [1][2][3]
       


surely exaggerate in past decades folk ensembles repertoire has been rearranged with new choreographies that are also very impressive but in my opinion they are altering traditional dance in way as modern instruments do that to folklore music, sadly 80% of all choreographic stagings in Macedonia originate from Tanec, such are
Komitsko Oro [1][2][3] basic steps from Shtip region
Kalajdziskko Oro [1][2][3][4][5] basic steps from Veles dances
Gyurgiovdensko Oro [1][2][3] Easter Dances
Poselje [1][2][3] basic steps from Tetovo region

The Best Dancer I Have Met

Once, when I was quite a young and wandering man, still in the stage of the Seeker, when walking in the mountains, I crossed over a green ridge and came upon a huge, rolling and round valley. In the valley bottom there were some thousands of people, all dressed nobly, and dancing in concentric circles. This was the first time I had witnessed Sacred Circle Dance. The people and their sacred movement was so beautiful, my heart leapt alive to witness it and I said to myself: I have finally discovered it. This is what I must aspire to. This is the way to worship God.
Then I noticed circles groups of people on the rolling hills around the deep mountain valley. These people were also dancing, but they were also singing. And singing so beautifully! Ah! I said to my self, No ... this - this is the way I must aspire to become. This is truly the best way to worship God.

But then I heard sweet chorales and melodies and there, higher up, on the mountainsides, I saw circles of beings singing, swaying and playing such sacred music upon their instruments that it inspired the people below to dance the Sacred Dances. Ah, I said to my self, how wonderful it is that I have found this for this is the way I must aspire to be. This is truly the best way to worship God.

Ah, but then my heart stirred, for upon the mountain tops I saw the most wondrous of beings. I was sure they were angels. And the rivers of music and blessings which flowed from them as they glorified Lord was the source and inspiration of all that went on the hillsides and in the valley below. Ah, I said to my self, I am lost, for this, which I can never hope to become as in my lifetime, must truly be the way to worship God and to serve the clans of all beings.

But then my eyes roamed into the heavens and there, floating above the mountains and the valley, there in a sweetness and purity so bright it seemed to nearly blinded my heart and eyes, there were beings of power and light whose essence was pure music, pure dance, pure service of all beings and pure devotion to the Lord. My soul was filled with hopelessness and hope all at the same moment for I knew that, even though I could never equal the ability of these archangels to serve the clans of life and to glorify God, still this was what I must aspire to become like to fulfill my highest purpose on earth.

Then I heard a sound just below me. A whimper, in fact, is what I heard. And a sniffle. I looked down and there beside me on the dirt crouched a small girl. I believe she was about four years old. She had snot on her the cuff of her sleeve from wiping her nose. She was fairly smudged with dirt and grime. Her clothes were old. ill-fitting and tattered. And she was lame. She could not dance at all. Upon her face were soft tears which came from her heart as she witnessed the beauty of the souls dancing below.

I knew then and have remembered ever after that here was the being I must aspire to be like, for there was no higher way to worship than this. There could never be a truer or more authentic dance...

http://www.sacredcircles.com/THEDANCE/HTML/DANCEPAG/OPENYOUR.HTM



Edited by Max - 23-Jul-2017 at 18:40
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  Quote Max Quote  Post ReplyReply #20 Posted: 17-May-2012 at 20:12

many dances has own complementary song e.g. with Maskoto Oro goes along the song Filka Moma [1], Kostursko Oro with Dodek je Moma [1], Arap Oro goes along Zajko Kokorajko [1][2][3][4][5 etc., this paralel is flexible because for one dance there can be different songs depending on region of origin, or ussualy with most of the songs is danced Lesnoto/Pravoto Oro (EasyOne/Direct or StraightOne) as simple everyday dance...

playing, dancing and singing are three forces in the process of creating folklore masterpiece, but their tuning-fork sources are also as important as they are, such are culture, geography and cussine, mostly responsible for longevity of our tradition! all of these through history were bonding macedonian ethnic code in way that today cannot be dismantle nor by wars, separations or politics, as long as there is will for living the tradition instead of putting it in museums, at least music should stay pure and unforgotten if everything else evaporate, and even no one it'll be capable to play and dance at least singing will remain live and same - coz as features of the soul word is endless and voice is purest emanation of eternity       

famous macedonian songs are partly listed on following links [1][2][3][4][5] and next video is mix of 5 songs from 3 main geographical regions in Macedonia       



among folklore singers in Macedonia respectfull status have female voices like Vaska Ilieva, Anka Gieva, Vanja Lazarova, Mirvet Belovska, Violeta Tomovska, Kostadinka Palazova, Petranka Kostadinova and nonetheless famous male warblers such Nikola Badev, Aleksandar Sarievski, Kiril Mancevski, Mirko Mitrevski, Zoran Georgiev, Trpe Cerepovski, Naum Petrevski etc. all of them performing traditional songs [1][2] but also new adaptations or even own compositions such as famous songs of Jonce Hristovski - Makedonsko Devojce, Zasvirete mi Calgii i Ako Umram il Zaginam
and among new performers outstands interpretations of Elena Hristova, Todor Proevski, Vera Milosevska, Saso Gigov, Dobrila Graseska, Bobi Andonov, Aleksandra Mangarovska etc.

culture is idea of cosmopolitism best expressed by music as universal languge, here people were singing all the time, in good or bad times singing was substitute for laughing and crying, singing was and still is best way to praise God and life and to stay in touch with creativity, here singing was and still is way of cheerfull comunication instead of talking... as cosequence in this country songs are with plenty of different moods, in same time fairly simple but enlightening wise, even today e.g. traditional limbo song Naseto Selo [1][2 which in few verses talks about boredom, carelessness and forgetfulness   

important to notice is that as with Orthodox Chrurch Singing songs are very alike or similar in neighboring contries because originate from same ethnological substrate overlaping around Macedonia as center of that cultural substratum, except that here in the core music was perfected in specific way or better to say practiced in rather different circumstances! it is well known that was challenging to stay calm in times like otoman feudalism or balkan romantism(second one still lasts) and here that was achieved only by chanalising all fears and tears through songs, singing was like easy burden carrier but also cultural strugal for freedom, similar as in modern times was reggae in Jamaica, just that in Macedonia every house had have own Power Singer instead of gramophone

also among cultural richness of our country is ethnic musical diversity and can be easly noticed by Roma people and their dance Chochek and singers such Esma Redzepova [1] or Muarem Serbezovski and brass performers like Ferus Mustafov [1], Agusevi, Cerkezi or Kocani Orchestra but also chalgija performers as Marem Aliev

Edited by Max - 02-Oct-2014 at 21:57
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